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Nanaimo Family History Society

Passenger List Indexing Project

Contents


Introduction

        Welcome to the NFHS Passenger Lists Indexing Project. The manifests of ships arriving at Canadian Ports listing passengers have been preserved on microfilm at Library and Archives Canada.   Indexing of passengers arrivals at Quebec Ports (Montreal is included in the Port of Quebec) for the period  31 Jul 1903 to 13 Oct 1910 has been completed by NFHS. An additional eight arrivals prior to this period are also included. Details of these are show above the index listings.  This index, comprising 757,749 listings from 1,403 ship arrivals, is shown on these pages. 
 
This update finishes the indexing project. With other indexes becoming available on line we have found interest in the project waning, which made it difficult to finish the project.

What are the Passenger Lists

        The vast majority of persons arrived on passenger ships. The list for each passenger ship usually (but not always) is comprised of a front page and as many pages as necessary listing the passengers. The front page listed details of the ship such as its tonnage and master, when and where it left, when it arrived, number of passengers and a certification as to the health of the passengers. It also listings of when the inspections started and finished and when the trains left. Earlier listings did not show as many details of the ship and passage and commenced listing the passengers on the front page. The pages listing the passengers were usually broken down into salon passengers (first class), intermediate passengers and steerage.  In each class, the passengers would frequently grouped by Returning Canadian, British Settlers, Foreign Settlers and those destined for the U.S. Usually these groupings would be in a rough sort of alphabetical order, however if the ship picked up persons at a second port, those persons may appear at the end of that group.  The shipping line, either the ticket office or the purser (or someone else on the ship) would write out the passenger list filling in most of the columns. Then at the port, the Immigration Agent would add details such as the amount of money they were carrying and who and what they were going to. Sometimes details of events that happened afterwards, such as the person leaving the country or being deported are also noted.

Examples of  the Pages

       The front page and a passenger page from the SS Teutonic arriving at Halifax 27 April 1914 are shown below. These are composite images as more than one print per page must be made in order to get legible results. Clicking on the image will open a larger image. Use the back button on your browser to return to this page after viewing the images.

tn Teutonic front page
Front Page of SS Teutonic. Click for larger image (194 KB)

tn Teutonic page 15
A Passenger Page from the SS Teutonic. Click for a larger image (155 KB)

Who are being Indexed?

       All passengers shown on the ships manifest are being indexed.  This includes returning Canadians, tourists, passengers destined for the US and persons whose names have been crossed out. As a result you may see a person more than once as they return to Canada from visits overseas. Persons whose names have been crossed out are annotated as such. They may be shown in a different section of the same ship or they may have never boarded the ship.

Considerations When Viewing the Index

       The passengers lists are hand-written and some of the writing was very faint when filmed so errors can arise when deciphering what was written so check alternative spellings as well. If a letter could not be deciphered, a "?" was put in its place. Surnames whose first letter could not be read are shown under Unknown and Illegible Surnames, otherwise they are grouped alphabetically. Differences in writing the names like "O'Brian", "O Brian" and "OBrian" will cause them to be sorted into different areas so check all the possibilities. We are transcribing the names as they appear on the list. Many compound surnames on the lists are written such that only the final name appears as the surname, for example "Spruyt de Bay" appears under "Bay" so remember to check under both. It would be equally possible for the names to appear under "de Bay" as well.

       The indexers have found that some names seem to be transposed. The printed manifest sheets do not indicate a particular column for given name and surname.The ship's purser seems to write names whichever way he prefers. Some ships passenger lists are surnames first, others have the given name first. Unfortunately it seems that the purser forgets which way he is writing the names and if it is not clear to the transcriber which name is what, the name will be transcribed in the order of the majority of the names on that list. Consequently some given names may appear in the surname column. If you can't find your person try searching for that person's given name in the surname listing.

The Index

        The index files are in Portable Document Format (pdf) and require Acrobat Reader in order to view them. If you do not already have Acrobat Reader you can download it for free from this site.  You are welcome to save the files to your hard disk so you can look at them as often as you want without having to download them each time. To save the files to your computer.  Right click the file you want and choose "Save target as". The "Save in" box at the top will tell you what directory you are saving it to (you can change it if you wish) and the file name is in the "File name" box. Remember these so that you can find them when you want to view them.

Use the back button on your browser to return to this page.
The index covers Quebec Ports (including Montreal) for the periods 31 Jul 1903 to 13 Oct 1910.

It also includes the Tunisian arriving  11 Jul 1902, the Pomerainian arrivng 13 Sep 1902, the Bavarian arriving 11 Oct 1902 and the Sicilian arriving 22 Jul 1902, 30 Sep 1902, 10 Nov 1902, 20 May 1903 and 30 Jun 1903.
Surnames Starting With
Blank-illegible, M illegible, N-Abl Abm-Ade Adg-Ald Ale-Allen Aller-Anderse
Anderso-Anderson, P Anderson, R-Ans Ant-Armo Arms-Ashp Asht-Aug Auh-Bad
Bae-Baker, G Baker, H-Bal Bam-Bari Bark-Barq Barr-Barz Bas-Bax
Bay-Bec Bed-Bell, M Bell, N-Bens Bent-Bern Bero-Bid Bie-Bir
Bis-Blad Blae-Blo Blu-Bol Bom-Bor Bos-Bowl Bowm-Brad
Brae-Bren Brer-Brn Bro-Bros Brot-Brown, L Brown, M-Brum Brun-Bud
Bue-Burk Burl-Burz Bus-Bz C-Camd Came-Campb Campe-Carn
Caro-Carz Cas-Cg Ch-Chapm Chapn-Chil Chim-Chu Chv-Clark?
Clarke-Clem Clen-Cog Coh-Colle Colli-Conn Cono-Copper, F Cooper, G-Cor
Cos-Cow Cox-Crav Craw-Croo Crop-Cum Cun-Cze Czg-Dal
Dam-Dave Davi-Davie Davig-Daz De-Deh Dei-Des Det-Dicks
Dicky-Dob Doc-Don Doo-Doz Dp-Duc Dud-Duni Dunm-Dz
E-Edm Edn-Ek El-Elo Elp-Erh Eri-Evans, H Evans, I-Fai
Faj-Faz Fc-Ferg Ferh-Fink Fini-Fk Fl-Fn Fo-Forr
Fors-Fow Fox-Fraser, K Fraser, L-Frig Frik-Fz G-Gan Gao-Gas
Gat-Gen Geo-Gibr Gibs-Gille Gillf-Gle Gli-Goldi Goldj-Goq
Gor-Gou Gov-Grans Grant-Grd Gre-Gree Gref-Grim Grin-Gt
Gu-Gus Gut-Hag Hah-Hall, M Hall, N-Hamilton, J Hamilton, K-Hann Hano-Hardi
Hardl-Harrio Harris-Hars Hart-Hat Hau-Hayn Hayo-Hef Heg-Hende
Hendi-Herr Hers-Hif Hig-Hill Hilm-Hob Hoc-Hok Hol-Holm
Holn-Hop Hor-Hou Hov-Hs Hu-Huk Hul-Hun Huo-Hz
I-Irv Irw-Jackse Jackso-Jai Jaj-Jan Jao-Jenk Jenn-Johanse
Johanso-Johnson, J Johnson, K-Jom Jon-Jones, M Jones, N-Joz Jr-Kai Kam-Kar
Kas-Kee Kef-Kenm Kenn-Ker Kes-King, I King, J-Kis Kit-Knig
Knih-Kol Kom-Kos Kot-Krg Kri-Kul Kum-Lab Lac-Lamb
Lamc-Lap Laq-Lau Lav-Ld Le-Lee, Lee?-Lem Len-Lev
Lew-Lig Lih-Lip Lir-Lob Loc-Loo Lop-Lt Lu-Lun
Luo-Mab Mac-Macka Macke-Mae Maf-Mak Mai-Mann Mano-Mark
Marl-Marth Marti-Marz Mas-Mati Matj-Maye Mayf-Mccan Mccar-Mccy
Mcd-Mce Mcf-Mch Mci-Mckent Mckenz-Mcla Mcle-Mcmi Mcmo-Mcz
Md-Mel Mem-Mg Mi-Milk Mill-Millr Mills-Mis Mit-Moh
Moi-Moon Moor-Morga Morge-Morr Mors-Mud Mue-Muo Mur-Muz
Mve-Nat Nau-Nes Net-Nicholl Nicholo-Nilso Nilss-Norm Norn-Nz
O-Og Oh-Olsen, I Olsen, J-Orn Oro-Ov Ow-Pak Pal-Pari
Park-Parr Pars-Pats Patt-Pc Pe-Ped Pee-Perk Perl-Pete
Petf-Phillips, J Phillips, K-Pil Pim-Pl Pm-Pop Por-Pow Pox-Prin
Prio-Pup Pur-Rac Rad-Ram Ran-Raw Ray-Ree Ref-Rem
Ren-Rice Rich-Rid Rie-Rn Ro-Robertson, G Robertson, H-Robi Robj-Roi
Roj-Rosem Rosen-Rot Rou-Rud Rue-Ruz Rv-Sak Sal-Sande
Sandf-Sau Sav-Sche Schf-Schr Schs-Scott, J Scott, K-Seg Seh-Sez
Sf-Sha She-Shin Ship-Sik Sil-Simpson, J Simpson, K-Sj Sk-Sle
Sli-Smith, A Smith, B - I Smith, J - R Smith S-Sn So-Sot Sou-Sph
Spi-Stai Staj-Staz Ste-Stephena Stephens-Steward Stewart-Stk Sto-Stp
Str-Stub Stuc-Sus Sut-Swe Swg-Sz T-Tar Tas-Taylor, L
Taylor, M-Tep Ter-Thoma Thomb-Thomson, J Thomson, K-Til Tim-Tol Tom-Tow
Tox-Tr Ts-Turner, G Turner, H-Tz U-Vam Van-Vep Ver-Vn
Vo-Wai Waj-Walker, M Walker, N-Wals Walt-Warg Warh-Watk Watl-Waz
Wc-Weh Wei-Wen Weo-Wha Whe-White, White?-Wic Wid-Wilkins?
Wilkinso-Williams, J Williams, K-Wilr Wils-Wilson, M Wilson, N-Wir Wis-Won Woo-Wood
Wooe-Wright, H Wright, I-Ya Yb-Yz Z-Zi Zj-Zz
We make no warranty as to the accuracy and completeness of the index.

        The index is copyright by the Nanaimo Family History Society. You are permitted to download and use it for your own research only. Any other use requires the permission of the Nanaimo Family History Society.


The Columns

General - If the transcriber couldn't make out a portion of what was written out in a column, those letters (or letter) were replaced by “?”. If the transcriber could see something was written in a column but couldn't make it out, “illegible” was used.  If it was blank, then the column was left blank.

Surname - The list is sorted by surname.  Remember that if a transcriber was not able to make out all of the name, a “?” may replace some letters.  The “?” will sort to before the letters.

Given name - Is written as on the page.  Sometimes a military rank or title is used.

Arrival - The date the ship arrived.

Name of ship - The ships name.  “SS” was dropped if it was included in the ships name.

Age - On the passenger list, there are four columns for age, adult male, adult female, child male and child female (child under 14 years).  If a number was written in then that number is shown.  Frequently only the column was checked, in which case an a for Adult or c for child may be shown.  Be careful in using this distinction as marks made for other purposes may confuse the issue or obscure the original markings.  “inf” or “inft” indicates an infant. Some of earlier transcriptions may show an M or F for male or female in this column.  Later transcriptions show the sex in the notes column.  The sex is indicated only when the transcriber feels it is not apparent from the persons name.

Country of Birth - Shows the birth country as it is written on the list.  If English is shown then that will be written as opposed to England.  Sometimes Returning Canadian will be written or a stamp “RET’D CANADIAN” (indicating a returning Canadian) will obscure the original information, in which case “Retd Canadian” will be shown.  Returning Canadian does not mean the person was born in Canada.  It only means the person has established a residence in Canada and is returning.  Frequently the page will show where and how long the person has been in Canada.  See below for more information on country of birth.

Page number - Is comprised of two parts.  The first part (before the dash) is the number of the page starting with the first page that has passenger names listed.  The second portion shows the page number as shown on that page.

Port - Shows whether the ship arrived at Halifax or Quebec (which included Montreal).

Reel # - Is the number of the of microfilm that has the ship on it.  This is the number that the Library and Archives Canada uses.  If the ship is the first ship on the film you may find the film starting with passenger pages as opposed to the front page showing the details of the ships.  In that case front page for that ship is usually found on the preceding microfilm roll.

Notes - Is the place to show any additional data that the transcriber felt needed to be included.  If a persons name has been crossed out, the name will be included with a notation made here to the effect that it has been crossed out.  (m) or (f) indicates the person indicated had their age checked in the male or female column.  This is included only if the transcriber thought the name didn't indicate the sex.

Numbered Notes

01 - indicates the person was on a ship that we had problems with, in the transcribing of the list. See the listing of Problem Ships below.

02 - indicates that the person was only identified by their occupation to the person they were accompanying. In order to indicate who the person was travelling with we have modified the entry by inserting the surname of person they were accompanying. A separate listing of these persons is here.

Duplicate Names on the Same Ships Arrival

If someone was sent to Grosse Isle, there was an additional listing made up when they were released from Grosse-Īle on the same form as the passenger manifest. As these listing are with rest of the pages from that ship, they have been indexed as well. When you find a name that you are interested in and it is duplicated, it is possible that the person had been admitted to Grosse-Īle. You can confirm this by checking the Immigrants at Grosse-Īle website at the Canadian Genealogy Centre. If you initially don't find the person when searching by name, try searching by Ship and Year as their spellings may vary from ours.

Problem Ships

Canada arriving 4 November 1904 - A number of pages has been mixed up with the Bavarian arriving 29 October 1904. The persons indicated with an "01" will be found on that page number of the Bavarian.

Kastalia arriving  28 August 1906
- On the Library and Archives Canada website this ship is listed as the Nastalia.

Kensington arriving 24 June 1906 - On microfilm the Kensingtons Grosse Isle releases follows the Ionians (23 June 1906) Grosse Isle releases.

Lake Erie arriving 6 Nov 1906
- The cover page of the Sardinian arriving 8 Nov 1906 was inserted between pages 7 & 8 of the Lake Erie. The result of this is that passengers on pages eight through 12 of the Lake Erie are shown on the Library and Archives website as being on the Sardinian. For confirmation of this, image #4 of the Sardinian which is marked as page 10 names the Lake Erie immediately after the words "Second Class Canadian". If the person you are looking for is listed as being on pages 8 through 12 on the Lake Erie, bring up the Sardinian arriving on 8 Nov 1906,deduct six from the first part of the page number and that will be the image number on the Sardinian. The last part of the page number will confirm that you have the right page.

Latona arrivng 7 Sep 1906 - On the Library and Archives Canada website this ship is listed as the Latonia.

Manchester Commerce, arriving 20 June 1906 - On microfilm the list for this ship is found after Lake Champlains list of Grosse-Isle releases. On the Library and Archives Canada website it is the second page of the Manchester Commerce arriving 31 Jul 1906

Montreal arriving 30 Sep 1906 - The corner of a page is turned down and obscures the few rew letters of  8 names. As the list is in alphabectical order the names begin with a P,Q,R or S.

Montreal arriving Quebec, 22 Jul 1910 - This ship has two pages pages that are totally illegible. Up to sixty passenger names may be missing.

Prinz Adalbert arriving 16 May 1909, Konig Adalbert arriving  May 1909, Prinz Adalbert arriving May 1909 - These three ships are listed one after the other on microfilm T-4760. We suspect that these are possibly the same ship, however on a cover page the Konig Adalbert is written very legibly (many ships carrying large amounts of passengers have more than one cover page), so we are listing them as they appear.

Victorian arriving 7 May 1905 - The coverpage for the Victorian is 27 pages into the listing for that ship. While the first page of the Victorian is clearly indicated as the Victorian, Library and Archives Canada has placed the first twenty-six pages of the Victorian listing with with the Ottawa arriving on the same day. If the person you are interested in has a page number where the first three digits are lower than 027 then add 21 to the page number to find the listing on the Ottawa's listing. If the person has a page number greater than twenty seven, subtract 26 from the page number in order to find that person on the Victorian's listing.
 

Additional notes on Country of Birth.

        The map of the world has changed considerably since the early 1900's. The following list (found on film T-4759, with the Montreal arriving 28 September, 1908), is included to show what terms were being used in 1908.

List of Nationalities and their Several Races of People
AFRICAN, SOUTH
AUSTRALIAN
AUSTRIA HUNGARY
AUSTRIAN, (N.E.S)
   BOHEMIAN
    BUCKOWINIAN
    CROATIAN AND SLOVENIAN
    DALMATIAN, BOSNIAN AND HERZAGOVIAN
    GALICIAN
    HUNGARIAN (N.E.S.)
    MAGYAR
    RUTHENIAN
    SLOVAK
    STYRIAN

BELGIAN
BULGARIAN
BRAZILIAN
CHINESE
DUTCH
FRENCH
GERMAN EMPIRE
    GERMAN (N.E.S.)
     ALSACE-LORRAINE
     BAVARIAN
     PRUSSIAN
     SAXON
     WURTEMBURG

GREAT BRITAIN
     ENGLISH
     WELSH
     SCOTCH
     IRISH

WEST INDIAN
BERMUDIAN
JAMAICAN
GREEK
HEBREW
    HEBREW, (N.E.S)
          “           RUSSIAN
          “           POLISH
          “           AUSTRIAN
          “           GERMAN

ITALIAN
JAPANESE
NEWFOUNDLAND
NEW ZEALAND
PORTUGESE
POLISH
    POLES,  (N.E.S.)
         “         AUSTRIAN
         “         GERMAN
         “         RUSSIAN

PERSIAN
ROUMANIAN
    ROUMANIAN, (N.E.S.)
    MOLDAVIANS
    WALLACHIANS

RUSSIAN
    RUSSIAN (N.E.S)
    FINNS
    DOUKHOBORS
    MENNONITES

SPANISH
SWISS
SERVIAN
SCANDINAVIAN
    DANISH
    ICELANDIC
    SWEDISH
    NORWEGIAN

TURKISH
    TURKS
    ARMENIAN
    ASSYRIAN
    EGYPTIAN
    SYRIAN
    ARABIAN

U.S.A. CITIZENS


I think I've found who I'm looking for. How can I get copies of the original list?

It's your choice.

If you are near a centre that has the microfilms of the Ships Passenger Lists you can go there, look them up and obtain the copies yourself.

Library and Archives Canada now has the images of the passenger lists available on their website. It should be noted that their page numbering is different from ours. In general, our page numbers commence on the first page that has passenger names and their page numbers commence with the first image. You can also obtain the microfilm from Library and Archives Canada (see their website for how) and make your own copies.

Or you can get a copy from us.  If you wish to order from us, what we will send you is a copy of the front page that contains the details of the ship and its passage and a copy of the page that you request. In the case of cargo ships there may be only one page for the ship. Due to the limitations of our reader-printer and to preserve legibility, each page will be printed on at least two 8 1/2" x 11" sheets of paper. We are unable to take credit cards so we cannot take orders by e-mail. All orders must be mailed to us with a cheque or money order for the appropriate amount. Cost is $8.00 per order. If you wish more than one passenger page from the same ship's arrival, each additional page is an additional $4.00. For orders going to a Canadian address the funds are Canadian. For orders being mailed outside Canada, US funds are required. Please print out the order form so you can be sure of including all the details we require. On the form we have requested your e-mail address so that we can contact you in case we have a problem with your order. The most common problem will be that we may not be able to produce a legible print. If there are a number of  ?'s in the information you are interested in, the odds are that it is a hard to read page.



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Index last updated on 22 Jun 2013

This page last updated 24 Jun 2013