Auto Install for Mandrakelinux
Prev Next

Anatomy of the Boot Loader Configuration Files

Installation is initiated by 'booting' the computer with a specially created boot media (floppy or CD-ROM) that is used to start Stage 1 of the Mandrakelinux installation. Stage 1, after obtaining the necessary information, loads and activates the main installation program referred to as Stage 2. Stage 1 and Stage 2 are collectively known as DrakX. This section deals specifically with Stage 1 and the configuration files used by the boot loaders.

The boot media contains a Boot Loader, kernel and the Stage 1 program (the term 'gi' is associated with or is the name of the Stage 1 program). Due to changes in the Mandrakelinux distribution, there are now three different boot loader programs used, depending on the installation method desired. The following table illustrates the boot image files (located in images) and their associated media, boot loader and configuration file:

Image

Boot Media

Boot Loader

Configuration File

boot.iso

CD-ROM

isolinux

isolinux/isolinux.cfg

cdrom.img

floppy

syslinux

syslinux.cfg

hd_grub.img

floppy

grub

menu.lst

network.img and

network_drivers.img

2 x floppy

syslinux

syslinux.cfg

pcmcia.img

floppy

syslinux

syslinux.cfg





Please refer to the section Getting Started and the documentation INSTALL.txt and images/README (on your CD-ROM or the down loaded file set) for details regarding the creation of your desired boot media.

Regardless of the boot media used, the boot process goes something like this:

1.

The computers' BIOS reads the Master Boot Record (MBR),

2.

Then loads and runs the Boot Loader program,

3.

The Boot Loader reads its configuration file and retrieves the location and name of the file containing the kernel to be started and the parameters to be passed to the kernel (what this section is all about),

4.

The kernel is loaded and it in turn runs the Stage 1 install program (its actually hidden in the initial ram disk (the file ending with the .rdz extention).

5.

And now ...

The files, isolinux.cfg, menu.lst and syslinux.cfg are used to specify what the boot loader is supposed to do and what options, if any, are available to an installer (you) at boot time. In addition, the boot loader passes parameters to the linux kernel when it loads and starts the kernel; a few of the parameters are used by the kernel, but all the parameters are available to the Stage 1 program. Some of these parameters are specific to an installation method (as is the initial ram disk contained on the floppy/CD-ROM).

Consequently, the Auto Install diskette that you created (at the end of your initial installation or from the Mandrake Control Center on a running system) is set up to match the installation method that was originally used. If you are planning to install multiple computers the same way, then you are all set.

However, if you intend to change the installation method, you will have to create your own Auto Install diskette (see the section Scratch Built Auto Install Diskette). The reason for this is due to the flexibility needed to support a variety of installation methods and options. You just can not get it all on one diskette. This is not as bad as you may think, since the most important file, auto_inst.cfg, is independent of the installation method.

The following are going review the contents of the configuration files as used by MandrakeSoft. For an in-depth description of the capabilities of each loader, please visit their web sites:

for GRUB see the site: http://www.gnu.org/software/grub

for SYSLINUX/ISOLINUX see the site: http://syslinux.zytor.com

General

Lets begin with samples of the configuration files used for each boot loader. Please note the similarities / differences as you examine them.

This is a fragment extracted from a isolinux.cfg file used with a Network Services:NFS install:

default linux

prompt 1

timeout 50

display boot.msg

F1 help.msg

F2 advanced.msg

F3 boot.msg

label linux

kernel alt0/vmlinuz

append ramdisk_size=128000 initrd=alt0/all.rdz root=/dev/ram3 acpi=ht

vga=788 kickstart=floppy automatic=method:nfs,

server:fileserver,directory:/Mandrake/10.0,

network:static,ip:192.168.5.202,netmask:255.255.255.0,

gateway:192.168.5.253,dns:192.168.5.253



All the text starting with append through 255.255.255.0, are on ONE line.

This is a fragment extracted from a menu.lst file used with a Disk Install:

timeout 5

default 0

fallback 0


title Mandrake Install


root (hd0,6)

kernel /cooker/isolinux/alt0/vmlinuz ramdisk_size=128000

root=/dev/ram3 acpi=ht vga=788 kickstart=floppy

automatic=method:disk,dis:hde,par:hde7,dir:/cooker,

initrd /cooker/isolinux/alt0/all.rdz



All the text starting with kernel through cooker, are on ONE line.



This is a fragment extracted from a syslinux.cfg file used with a Network Services:NFS install.

default linux

prompt 1

timeout 50

display boot.msg

F1 help.msg

F2 advanced.msg

F3 boot.msg

label linux

kernel vmlinuz

append ramdisk_size=128000 initrd=network.rdz root=/dev/ram3 acpi=ht

vga=788 kickstart=floppy automatic=method:nfs,

server:fileserver,directory:/Mandrake/10.0,

network:static,ip:192.168.5.202,netmask:255.255.255.0,

gateway:192.168.5.253,dns:192.168.5.253



All the text starting with append through 255.255.255.0, are on ONE line.

As you can see, the syslinux.cfg and isolinux.cfg files are nearly identical but the menu.lst file is very different. Before we discuss these similarities / differences, we need to review the basic organization of the files.

Each file contains a set of directives which control the actions of the boot loader. These directives can be divided into two groups; global directives and section specific directives. The global ones control the operation of the boot loader, whereas the section directives are only effective when the installer (you) selects them.

The global directives usually occur at the beginning of the file and specify things like which section is selected by default, how long to wait for the installer to select a section, etc.

The section specific directives are identified by a line containing label <name> or title <name> and are followed by two or more lines which specify the kernel image to load and, what parameters to pass to the kernel (and the Stage 1 program) and the initial ram disk image to be used. The <name> parameter is the value that an installer would type in (or select) at the boot prompt to select a specific section other than the default one.

Two of the above fragments , syslinux.cfg and isolinux.cfg, are virtually identical except for the
kernel alt0/vmlinuz and the initrd=alt0/all.rdz. These similarities are the result of the two boot loaders being supplied by the same developer. The difference is simply due to the placement of the files on the associated boot media.

The third fragment, menu.lst, is substantially different. This is due to the fact that a different developer had a concept that differed from that of the developer of the other two fragments.

However, the important part of these three fragments begins with kickstart=. This is the start of the Stage 1 parameters and are the subject of this section.

The section Scratch Built Auto Install Diskette will provide you with example for all three boot loaders.



Directives

The following details the purpose of the directives that you can use in the three configuration files. You should visit the web page for each boot loader for more information regarding their capabilities and the options that are available to you. MandrakeSoft only uses a subset because they are generating "general purpose" files. You, on the other hand, are not as limited.

Boot Graphics

If you want to change the default graphics (boot.msg) for the syslinux or isolinux boot loaders, you need to read the file /usr/share/doc/syslinux*/README.graphics.

Global Directives

The Global Directives are not method or mode specific, rather they affect all methods / modes the same.

Global Directives for syslinux / isolinux

default linux

if the user presses ENTER or the optional timeout expires, this tells the loader to locate the section with the label linux and begin booting the kernel as defined by the lines after the label <name>.

prompt 1

this tells the loader to prompt the user to enter an alternate label rather than just using the default section. You can have several different boot scenarios in this file, which is the reason that the generated file has so much in it. This parameter is optional, removing it means the installer (you) will not have the ability to select an alternate boot section.

timeout 50

this tells the loader to give the installer (you) 5 seconds to begin entering another label before using the default section and continuing on with the boot/install process. This parameter is optional and is not necessary if prompt is not used.

display boot.msg

this tells the loader to display the contents of the specified file before presenting a prompt. This is optional, but it may be a good idea to remind the installer what is being installed. If you want a flashy graphic message, then see the file
/usr/share/doc/syslinux*/README.graphics.

F1 help.msg

if the user presses the F1 key, then display the specified file's contents. This parameter and associated file are optional.

F2 advanced.msg

if the user presses the F2 key, then display the specified file's contents. This parameter and associated file are optional.

F3 boot.msg

if the user presses the F3 key, then display the specified file's contents. This parameter and associated file are optional.

label linux

this names a section that defines specific information that the loader uses for booting Stage 1 of the installation process. The value associated with any section label can be typed by the user at the prompt to instruct the loader to find the specific section, rather than use the one named by the default directive.

Global Directives for grub

default 0

if the optional timeout expires, this tells the loader to locate the first section with the title keyword and begin booting the kernel as defined by the lines after the title. As usual, the debate about 0 meaning first continues.

fallback 0

this tells the loader to use an alternate section should a error be encountered with the default section. This parameter is optional, removing it means the installer will not have the ability to select an alternate boot section.

timeout 5

this tells the loader to give the user 5 seconds to select another section (title) before using the default and continuing on with the boot/install process. A value of 0 means wait forever.

title linux

this names a section that defines specific information that the loader uses for booting Stage 1 of the installation process. The value associated with any section label can be selected by the user at the prompt to instruct the loader to find the specific section, rather than use the one identified by the default directive.

Section Directives

Section directives are preceded with the label (or title) directive.

Section Directives for syslinux / isolinux

In this case, a section contains a kernel and an append directive (see the section Advanced Features for special options).

kernel vmlinuz

this is the name of the file containing the compressed kernel image to load and start.

append=...

this is a list of space separated parameters passed to the kernel when the loader starts it.

If you look in the file that was generated, you will find a number of sections (choices) that an installer could select. Each has a different effect or purpose which the following table briefly describes:

vgalo, vgahi, vga16

Are just different resolutions for graphic installs.

text

Is a text based install.

expert

Has the advantage of disabling Automatic Hardware Detection.

rescue

Allows you to repair an already installed system using the CD-ROM.

patch

Allows you to install a patch from a floppy diskette.

acpi

Enables the Advanced Configuration and Power Interface. The other sections limit the ACPI to boot time enumeration. See the kernel documentation for more details.

memtest

Starts the stand-alone memory test. NOTE: only available when using the CD-ROM created from the boot.iso image.



Section Directives for grub

In this case, a section contains a kernel and an initrd directive (see the section Advanced Features for special options).

root (hd0,6)

this tells the boot loader what disk drive and partition on the hard disk, as seen from the BIOSs' perspective, where the specified kernel and initial ram disk can be found.

This can be really tricky for those of you, like me, using a mother board with a 'promise' controller (possibly others) that an installed system sees as /dev/hde but the BIOS sees it as the first hard drive.



Mandrake has provided a web page to help you solve this little pain in the butt at: http://qa.mandrakesoft.com/hd_grub.cgi.

kernel ...

this is a list of space separated parameters passed to the kernel when the loader starts it. The name of the compressed kernel image is specified here and the boot loader installs it into memory before activating it and passing it the parameters.

initrd ...

this is the location of the initial ram disk image that is loaded and used to create a temporary file system for the kernel when the loader starts it.



Stage 1 Parameters

DrakX supports a substantial number of parameters that can be used to control its operation. This section will describe just the ones that affect the Automated Install.



You are going to get caught with this one so I will tell you now; the kernel will only pass a maximum of 256 characters from the 'append' (or 'kernel') line through to the Stage 1 installer, so be careful.

If you examine the configuration file fragments closely, you will notice that there are a few kernel parameters present. These are normally placed at the end of the 'append' (or 'kernel') line so that the 256 character limit can be fully used for parameters passed to the Stage 1 installer. For the convenience of this documents text, I placed them at the end.

General Parameters

The following are common and not related to a specific method or mode but they are specific to the boot loader used.

General Paramters for syslinux / isolinux

kickstart=floppy

required, do not change. This actually causes the installer to look on the floppy diskette for the auto_inst.cfg file.

An interesting tidbit; if you omit this option and set the automatic= option, you can do GUI based installs without having to enter the method information each time. Of course the auto_inst.cfg file, if present, is ignored.

netauto

optional, this parameter is required if you are using a DHCP server to provide the name of the auto_inst.cfg file. See the section Advanced Features - DHCP Server.

ramdisk_size=128000

required kernel parameter, do not change.

root=/dev/ram3

required kernel parameter, do not change.

acpi=ht

optional kernel parameter, dependent on your motherboard. For more details check the kernel document Documentation/kernel-parameters.txt.

vga=788

required, can be changed. Generally, this parameter affects the GUI installation, but it does have interesting effects when used in the Automated install. If you want details, then check out the kernel documents: Documentation/svga.txt and Documentation/i386/boot.txt

text

80x25 text

vga16

80x25 text, 640 x 480 GUI

785

80x30 text, 640 x 480 GUI (frame buffer)

788

100x37 text, 800 x 600 GUI (frame buffer)

791

130x48 text, 1024 x 768 GUI (frame buffer)

794

158x64 text, 1280 x 1024 GUI (frame buffer)

Others you can play with:

0x0f01

80x50 text

0x0f02

80x43 text

0x0f03

80x28 text

0x0f05

80x30 text

0x0f06

80x34 text

0x0f07

80x60 text

0x0122

100x30 text

Ask

prompt for desired video characteristics to use. You can use this to determine the selections actually available for your video card.

initrd=network.rdz

required, changes based on the type of method being used:

cdrom.rdz

for CD-ROM

hd_grub.rdz

for Hard Disk

network.rdz

for Network Services

all.rdz

used with 'boot.iso'

pcmcia.rdz

for PCMCIA devices

General Parameters for grub

kickstart=floppy

required, do not change. This actually causes the installer to look on the floppy diskette for the auto_inst.cfg file.

An interesting tidbit; if you omit this option and set the automatic= option, you can do GUI based installs without having to enter the method information each time. Of course the auto_inst.cfg file, if present, is ignored.

ramdisk_size=128000

required kernel parameter, do not change.

root=/dev/ram3

required kernel parameter, do not change.

acpi=ht

optional kernel parameter, dependent on your motherboard. For more details check the kernel document Documentation/kernel-parameters.txt.

vga=788

required, can be changed. Generally, this parameter affects the GUI installation, but it does have interesting effects when used in the Automated install. If you want details, then check out the kernel documents: Documentation/svga.txt and Documentation/i386/boot.txt

text

80x25 text

vga16

80x25 text, 640 x 480 GUI

785

80x30 text, 640 x 480 GUI (frame buffer)

788

100x37 text, 800 x 600 GUI (frame buffer)

791

130x48 text, 1024 x 768 GUI (frame buffer)

794

158x64 text, 1280 x 1024 GUI (frame buffer)

Others you can play with:

0x0f01

80x50 text

0x0f02

80x43 text

0x0f03

80x28 text

0x0f05

80x30 text

0x0f06

80x34 text

0x0f07

80x60 text

0x0122

100x30 text

Ask

prompt for desired video characteristics to use. You can use this to determine the selections actually available for your video card.

Method Parameters

The automatic parameter is used to select the install method type (cdrom, disk, nfs, ftp or http) and to specify additional parameters as necessary. Any additional parameters are appended after the method type, with each being separated by a COMMA (,) rather than a SPACE. It uses the following general form:

automatic=method:<type>,<parameter>:<value>,

The following are a summary of the method parameters grouped by method type along with any special notes. The additional parameters are simply concatenated together to form a single comma separated string.



CD-ROM

automatic=method:cdrom,



For those of you that are using CD-ROMs as the source media, the option interactive (see the section Anatomy of the 'auto_inst.cfg' File) is especially pertinent to package installation from more than the first CD.

domain:eastcott.net,

allows you to preset the domain name for the computer.

hostname:linux1,

allows you to set the host name for the computer.

Disk

automatic=method:disk,

directory:/Mandrake/10.0,

root directory where the files are found or, it may also specify the location and name of an ISO image (this image must be the 'first' CD's ISO image).



If you specify an ISO file name, then you will be limited to installing ONLY those packages which are available in that ISO image. You will not be able to install packages from the other ISO images which form the complete set.

disk:hda,

disk drive containing the directory or ISO image.

domain:eastcott.net,

allows you to preset the domain name for the computer.

hostname:linux1,

allows you to set the host name for the computer.

partition:hda6,

partition number of the specified disk drive containing the directory or ISO image.



NFS Network Services

automatic=method:nfs,

interface:eth1,

specifies the ethernet interface to use (eg. eth0, eth5, etc.). It is only required when there is more than 1 ethernet interface. This feature can only be used if DrakX can auto detect ALL the ethernet cards.

The trick when installing with multiple network card is convincing the computer that the ethX you specify is the same one it thinks is ethX. If you do not use the interface parameter, DrakX will ask you which one you want and then it will prompt you for the relevant information based on your specified method.

server:fileserver,

machine where the installable files are located, can be an IP or a host.domain (or host).

directory:/Mandrake/10.0,

root directory where the files are found.

network:static,

means you are going to specify the necessary IP information;

ip:192.168.5.202,

what is it for this machine.

netmask:255.255.255.0,

what is it's netmask. This is optional and is only required if you are using a non-standard netmask.

gateway:192.168.5.253,

what is the gateway's IP. This is optional and should only be included if the specified fileserver is not located on the same subnet.

dns:192.168.5.253,

what is the IP for the DNS server. Up to three DNS servers can be specified, each IP is separated by a comma. This is optional and should not be included if you do not have or use a DNS server. If it is not included, then the server: option must contain an IP address instead of a name.

or


network:dhcp,

means the IP, netmask, gateway and dns parameters are provided by the dhcp server. Depending on how the dhcp and DNS servers are configured, the host name and domain name may also be supplied.

or


network:adsl,

means the IP, netmask, gateway and dns parameters are provided by the ADSL service provider when you connect.

adsluser:my_adsl_name,

user name, as required, to login to your ADSL service provider.

adslpass:my_password,

password, as required, to login to your ADSL service provider.



If you have selected network:adsl, be aware that ONLY the PPPoE protocol is currently supported.

domain:eastcott.net,

optionally allows you to preset the domain name for the computer. This parameter is only required if the stage 1 installer can not obtain the domain name from your DNS Server for the IP address that you specified.

hostname:linux1,

optionally allows you to set the host name for the computer. This parameter is only required if the stage 1 installer can not obtain the host name from your DNS Server for the IP address that you specified.

FTP Network Services

automatic=method:ftp,

interface:eth1,

specifies the ethernet interface to use (eg. eth0, eth5, etc.). It is only required when there is more than 1 ethernet interface. This feature can only be used if DrakX can auto detect ALL the ethernet cards.

The trick when installing with multiple network card is convincing the computer that the ethX you specify is the same one it thinks is ethX. If you do not use the interface parameter, DrakX will ask you which one you want and then it will prompt you for the relevant information based on your specified method.

server:fileserver,

machine where the installable files are located, can be an IP or a host.domain (or host).

directory:/Mandrake/10.0,

root directory where the files are found.

network:static,

means you are going to specify the necessary IP information;

ip:192.168.5.202,

what is it for this machine.

netmask:255.255.255.0,

what is it's netmask. This is optional and is only required if you are using a non-standard netmask.

gateway:192.168.5.253,

what is the gateway's IP. This is optional and should only be included if the specified fileserver is not located on the same subnet.

dns:192.168.5.253,

what is the IP for the DNS server. Up to three DNS servers can be specified, each IP is separated by a comma. This is optional and should not be included if you do not have or use a DNS server. If it is not included, then the server: option must contain an IP address instead of a name.

or


network:dhcp,

means the IP, netmask, gateway and dns parameters are provided by the dhcp server. Depending on how the dhcp and DNS servers are configured, the host name and domain name may also be supplied.

or


network:adsl,

means the IP, netmask, gateway and dns parameters are provided by the ADSL service provider when you connect.

adsluser:my_adsl_name,

user name, as required, to login to your ADSL service provider.

adslpass:my_password,

password, as required, to login to your ADSL service provider.



If you have selected network:adsl, be aware that ONLY the PPPoE protocol is currently supported.

domain:eastcott.net,

optionally allows you to preset the domain name for the computer. This parameter is only required if the stage 1 installer can not obtain the domain name from your DNS Server for the IP address that you specified.

hostname:linux1,

optionally allows you to set the host name for the computer. This parameter is only required if the stage 1 installer can not obtain the host name from your DNS Server for the IP address that you specified.

user:anonymous,

user name, as required, for ftp login.

pass:david@eastcott.net,

pass word, as required, for ftp login.

proxy_host:prx.eastcott.net,

optionally specifies the gateway to contact the real ftp host.

proxy_port:8080,

used with proxy_host to specify the port number to be used.

HTTP Network Services

automatic=method:http,

interface:eth1,

specifies the ethernet interface to use (eg. eth0, eth5, etc.). It is only required when there is more than 1 ethernet interface. This feature can only be used if DrakX can auto detect ALL the ethernet cards.

The trick when installing with multiple network card is convincing the computer that the ethX you specify is the same one it thinks is ethX. If you do not use the interface parameter, DrakX will ask you which one you want and then it will prompt you for the relevant information based on your specified method.

server:fileserver,

machine where the installable files are located, can be an IP or a host.domain (or host).

directory:/Mandrake/10.0,

root directory where the files are found.

network:static,

means you are going to specify the necessary IP information;

ip:192.168.5.202,

what is it for this machine.

netmask:255.255.255.0,

what is it's netmask. This is optional and is only required if you are using a non-standard netmask.

gateway:192.168.5.253,

what is the gateway's IP. This is optional and should only be included if the specified fileserver is not located on the same subnet.

dns:192.168.5.253,

what is the IP for the DNS server. Up to three DNS servers can be specified, each IP is separated by a comma. This is optional and should not be included if you do not have or use a DNS server. If it is not included, then the server: option must contain an IP address instead of a name.

or


network:dhcp,

means the IP, netmask, gateway and dns parameters are provided by the dhcp server. Depending on how the dhcp and DNS servers are configured, the host name and domain name may also be supplied.

or


network:adsl,

means the IP, netmask, gateway and dns parameters are provided by the ADSL service provider when you connect.

adsluser:my_adsl_name,

user name, as required, to login to your ADSL service provider.

adslpass:my_password,

password, as required, to login to your ADSL service provider.



If you have selected network:adsl, be aware that ONLY the PPPoE protocol is currently supported.

domain:eastcott.net,

optionally allows you to preset the domain name for the computer. This parameter is only required if the stage 1 installer can not obtain the domain name from your DNS Server for the IP address that you specified.

hostname:linux1,

optionally allows you to set the host name for the computer. This parameter is only required if the stage 1 installer can not obtain the host name from your DNS Server for the IP address that you specified.

proxy_host:prxy.eastcott.net,

optionally specifies the gateway to contact the real http host.

proxy_port:8080,

used with proxy_host to specify the port number to be used.



DHCP Notes

Documenting how you should use the network:dhcp option and the related domain and hostname options is difficult since they are highly dependent on the characteristics and interactions of your DHCP and DNS servers. In addition to the conventional servers, there are a number of devices capable of acting as DHCP servers for a LAN which are designed primarily for use in the Windows world and may require a bit of effort on your part to get it working.

Since there are may ways to set the DHCP / DNS servers up, I will present a few of the more common arrangements and what may be required for the Stage 1 installer. These are by no means the only ways.

DHCP servers can be configured to provide IP, host name and domain name information based solely on the ethernet address of the network card in a computer. An associated DNS server can be pre-configured with the IP and host name association, or the DHCP server can inform the DNS server of the IP/name association (Dynamic DNS). In this case all that is required is the network:dhcp, parameter.

Another configuration scenario is where the computer must supply a host name when requesting IP information, then the DHCP server will return the IP, host name, and domain name information. This is the usual case for most Cable Modem connections and is the behaviour exhibited by most Windows based computers. Again, the DNS server can be pre-configured with the association or the DHCP server can inform it with the necessary information (DDNS). In this case, both the network:dhcp, and hostname:linux1, parameters are required.

Finally, there is the case where the DHCP server does not return the host name or domain name to be used, and/or the DNS server does not contain the IP to name association or is not informed by the DHCP server. In this case you will need to supply all three parameters, network:dhcp,hostname:linux1,domain:eastcott.net.

The Stage 1 installer passes what ever information it is provided (from the parameters supplied, from the DHCP server or the DNS server) to the stage 2 installer to set up the final configuration for your computer. Your actual DHCP / DNS environment will have an impact on two possible aspects of an automated install. For NFS installs, if the IP that you are assigned does not have an associated host name that the NFS server can obtain from a DNS server, you will have to ensure that the NFS server is set for IP authentication rather than name authentication (see the section Setting up a Simple NFS Server, Step 5). Also, the DHCP server can be configured to supply the name and location of the auto_inst.cfg file (see the section DHCP Server) in the Advanced Features section of this document.

Regardless of how you think every things is supposed to work, you are advised to discuss things with your network administrator and experiment a bit to determine the best approach(s) for your actual environment.

Method Parameter Aliases

The problem of the 256 character line length can be mitigated somewhat by the use of aliases for some of the parameters as follows:

Full Name

Alias

adslpass

adslp

adsluser

adslu

directory

dir

disk

dis

domain

dom

gateway

gat

hostname

hos

interface

int

method

met

netmask

netm

network

netw

password

pass

partition

par

proxy_host

proxh

proxy_port

proxp

server

ser

user

use



By rewriting one of the fragments from the beginning of this section using the aliases, you get the following:

default linux

prompt 1

timeout 50

display boot.msg

F1 help.msg

F2 advanced.msg

F3 boot.msg

label linux

kernel vmlinuz

append kickstart=floppy automatic=met:nfs,

ser:fileserver,dir:/Mandrake/10.0,

netw:static,ip:192.168.5.202,netm:255.255.255.0,

gat:192.168.5.253,dns:192.168.5.253 ramdisk_size=128000

initrd=network.rdz root=/dev/ram3 acpi=ht vga=788



All the text starting with append through 788 are on ONE line.

For those of you who noticed, this example is now passed through to the Stage 1 installer intact (which, by the way, the original fragment is not).










PrevHome Next
Installation Methods   Anatomy of the 'auto_inst.cfg' File