BACK TO THE PAS

Dad and I went back to The Pas and got a job with a man moving houses. We would jack up the buildings, put logs under for rollers, then by use of cables and block-and-tackle, powered by horses, the houses were moved along for sometimes quite long distances.

One day we were moving a two room house. I was kneeling in front of it using a jack to straighten a roller, when the team started on their own, pulling the house up on my knee, so that the whole weight of the front end was on my knee. There I stayed until the boss came and jacked it up off my knee, leaving only a few bruises. I guess God was with me again, although at the time I just thought of myself as being lucky. We moved houses for a couple of months and then closed down for the lack of houses to move.

I got a job making hay in the Carrot Valley, just a few miles from The Pas. I was working with a boxer named Jack Dryden. We would work out together and though I had always been a fair boxer, I guess that is where I first thought of making it a profession. However when it came time to harvest, the old craving took over, so I took a freight down to Kuroki, Saskatchewan, and got on with a threshing crew, in my old home town. It was good working with people I knew and amongst old friends.

By the time we had finished threshing, Dad, Clara and the kids had moved to Tisdale, Saskatchewan, so I went up there to spend some time with Mable and the kids and Dad.

Dad was trying to buy fur, but there didn't seem to be much trapping done around there that year. He and Clara were fighting like a dog and cat. She finally went back to her folks in The Pas with Henry and Claire.

Although there was a lot of snow that year in January and they didn't plow the roads in those days, we started out in an old model T, trying to keep that old car on the sleigh roads, which were just a little too narrow for the wheels. We kept sliding off the road and we would shovel and push till we got out, then go again. One time we had to wake a farmer up and get him to come and pull us out. We finally got through to Uncle Bert's.